Archives for Musings

All my new businesses!

I don’t mention it much, but I’m an entrepreneurial, go-get-‘em, many-irons-in-the-fire, have-my-people-call-your-people kind of guy! Barely a day goes by when I don’t start a new business with a choice punning name and announce it on Twitter.

Twitter just switched …

Some of my old BlitzMax games

When I was in school I used to spend a lot of my time making games in Blitz Basic (and later BlitzMax). Eventually, as I got older and more boring, I ran out of ideas and started doing other things. …

A huggermuggering nonannouncement of an overinvolved knickknack

It’s odd, the process of waking up. Sometimes you can get out of bed and stumble around for an hour or two, maybe even get dressed and go to work, before your brain does anything to differentiate you from a …

Fibonacci Grids

I uploaded this video to YouTube last week but I forgot to make a post here. It’s about a moderately interesting fact about fibonacci numbers that David Cushing told me at MathsJam. I generalised it a bit, so I’ve been …

Converting a stream of binary digits to a stream of base $n$ digits

James Coglan asked on twitter:

Problems I’m currently thinking about

I’ve been in a bit of a problem-posing mood recently. Hopefully I’ll do some problem-solving soon. Here are a few questions I’ve thought of but haven’t got solutions for. I haven’t done any literature searching, so these might have been …

Visualising the wrong data on the Guardian data blog

This visualisation shows for each council or unitary authority how many hours a week you’d need to work, earning minimum wage, in order to pay the median rent for a one-bed flat. The minimum wage is a national constant.

No …

Using a zero-knowledge protocol to prove you can solve a sudoku

I’ve just uploaded to youtube a video I made with Katie Steckles┬áto demonstrate why zero-knowledge protocols exist and how one works.

Katie is a habitual liar, so we followed the zero-knowledge protocol described in the paper, “Cryptographic and Physical …

Fractal dimension in IKEA

A long time ago, I realised that IKEA’s shopfitters must be experts in fractal dimension – they manage to lay out their shop so that you have to walk past every single thing they’re selling. You can’t just nip into …

MATH PROBLEMS?

Maths in the City posted this on twitter:

In order to make a number we can call, we need both of \[n=(10x)(13i^2)\] and \[m=\frac{\sin(xy)}{2.362x}\] to be integers.…